Another Torrance Home Sold by Lucy Garber!

5635 Greenmeadows St. Torrance CA SOLD

 

Just SOLD!

5635 Greenmeadows St Torrance 90505
Near the beach with a great city view!

$1,065,000

It’s a great time to sell in the Los Angeles South Bay. Please call me if you want an experienced, trustworthy real estate profession!

Your Friend in the Business,
Lucy Garber
(310) 293-4866
RE/MAX Estate Properties
License #01100090

Multi-level San Pedro Townhome on the Market

Picture this…

Entertaining friends in your gorgeous remodeled townhome while overlooking an AMAZING view of the Harbor and Bridge.

This 2 bedroom 2.5 bath end unit in Vista Del Oro does not disappoint. Main floor living area and dining area is all open with a beautiful fireplace and balcony to enjoy that view! The kitchen was redone with shaker style white cabinets, black granite counter tops and breakfast bar. The flooring throughout most of the home is “wood look” tile and super durable. Great for pets. All 3 bathrooms have been tastefully redone with a designers flair.

The floorplan is perfect for a roommate situation as both large bedrooms can have their own bathroom. Rare bonus here…an over-sized private 2-car garage with direct access to the home. Large closets and tons of storage.

Small complex with low HOA fees.

Don’t miss out on this move in ready beauty.

921 W. 18th Street, #4, San Pedro, CA 90731
Listing ID#: SB18048712
List Price: $469,999
Living Area: 1,273 sq. ft.
Lot: 5,011 sq. ft.
Built: 1986

Call or text Lucy Garber (310) 293-4866 to learn more and view home.
CalBRE License #: 1100090

Sell Your House this Summer: Do’s and Don’ts of Homebuyer Incentives

Homebuyer incentives can be smart marketing or a waste of money. Find out when and how to use them.

Be sure you’re sending the right message to buyers when you throw in a homebuyer incentive to encourage them to purchase your home.

When you’re selling your home, the idea of adding a sweetener to the transaction — whether it’s a decorating allowance, a home warranty, or a big-screen TV — can be a smart use of marketing funds. To ensure it’s not a big waste, follow these do’s and don’ts:

Do use homebuyer incentives to set your home apart from close competition. If all the sale properties in your neighborhood have the same patio, furnishing yours with a luxury patio set and stainless steel BBQ that stay with the buyers will make your home stand out.

Do compensate for flaws with a homebuyer incentive. If your kitchen sports outdated floral wallpaper, a $3,000 decorating allowance may help buyers cope. If your furnace is aging, a home warranty may remove the buyers’ concern that they’ll have to pay thousands of dollars to replace it right after the closing.

Don’t assume homebuyer incentives are legal. Your state may ban homebuyer incentives, or its laws may be maddeningly confusing about when the practice is legal and not. Check with your real estate agent and attorney before you offer a homebuyer incentive.

Don’t think buyers won’t see the motivation behind a homebuyer incentive. Offering a homebuyer incentive may make you seem desperate. That may lead suspicious buyers to wonder what hidden flaws exist in your home that would force you to throw a freebie at them to get it sold. It could also lead buyers to factor in your apparent anxiety and make a lowball offer.

Don’t use a homebuyer incentive to mask a too-high price. A buyer may think your expensive homebuyer incentive — like a high-end TV or a luxury car — is a gimmick to avoid lowering your sale price. Many top real estate agents will tell you to list your home at a more competitive price instead of offering a homebuyer incentive. A property that’s priced a hair below its true value will attract not only buyers but also buyers’ agents, who’ll be giddy to show their clients a home that’s a good value and will sell quickly.

If you’re convinced a homebuyer incentive will do the trick, choose one that adds value or neutralizes a flaw in your home. Addressing buyers’ concerns about your home will always be more effective than offering buyers an expensive toy.

By G.M. Filisko for Houselogic

Torrance is a Great Family Town

Looking for a great place for a young family? Check out Torrance!

Torrance schools are rated 9 out of 10 by Great! schools!  Torrance has 48 primary and secondary schools, with Richardson Middle School in south Torrance (go Rattlesnakes!), being rated one of the highest.  According to U.S. News, Torrance High School has a 99% graduation rate, followed closely by West High with 98%, and South and North at 97%.  South, West and North have all been awarded Silver Medals.

In addition to have great schools, the city of Torrance has wonderful, broad community programs.  The summer calendar below shows just some of the line up.  Great activities for the family to enjoy together, while enjoying our great weather!

>>> PRINTABLE VERSION <<<  Perfect for your refrigerator so your family doesn’t miss a single fun activity this summer in Torrance!

To learn about all of the many programs, see the City of Torrance Summer 2017 Seasons online PDF booklet here.

Interested in what homes are available for your family?

Please call me, Lucy Garber, at (310) 293-4866 so I can talk to you and help you find the perfect house for your family to call home.

Want to Refinance Your Mortgage But You’re Being Turned Down?

Can HARP help you refinance your mortgage?

Especially with the current record-low interest rates, many homeowners would like to refinance their mortgage.

Are you having difficulties? The federal program HARP might be able to help you. Here’s how it works.

Is your mortgage rate above today’s rates?

Is your house worth less than your current mortgage amount?

Are you unable to refinance into a lower-rate mortgage or convert your adjustable-rate mortgage to a fixed-rate mortgage?

Then the federal Home Affordable Refinance Program (HARP) is an option you should explore.

HARP is one of two components of the federal Making Home Affordable Program for struggling homeowners. Its counterpart, the Home Affordable Modification Program (HAMP), offers loan modifications if you’re behind on your payments or need help exiting gracefully if you can no longer afford your home.

HARP, on the other hand, helps you refinance your home with a brand new mortgage.

What Are the Benefits of HARP?

Your savings from refinancing using HARP could be substantial. The White House says the typical homeowner using HARP could reduce their mortgage payments by about $2,500 a year. Like any refinance transaction, HARP loans come with fees, so you’ll have to weigh the costs and benefits for your specific situation.

The good news is that HARP’s fees are less than the fees for typical refinances. For instance, you won’t have to pay for a full appraisal if the lender can get a reliable automated appraisal for your home. And Fannie and Freddie will waive for borrowers some fees they usually charge lenders (which lenders would normally pass on to you).

What Are the Qualifications?

Your mortgage must be owned or guaranteed by Freddie Mac or Fannie Mae.
Your current lender had to sell your mortgage to Fannie Mae or Freddie Mac before June 1, 2009. Check with your lender to make sure that happened.
This must be your first HARP refinance. You only get one Home Affordable refinance, so if you’ve used the program before, you can’t use it again (although there’s a loophole for those with a Fannie Mae loan refinanced between March and May of 2009).
You need the right balance between what you owe and your home’s value. The minimum is that you owe 80% of your home’s value (for example, owing $80,000 on your $100,000 home). If you owe less than 80%, you can’t use HARP. If you owe up to 105% (say your home is worth $100,000 and you owe $105,000), you can refinance into an adjustable-rate mortgage. If you owe above 105%, you have to go with a fixed-rate mortgage. There’s no cap on how much you can owe above what your home is worth.
If you’ve paid your mortgage late even once during the past six months, you can’t use HARP, but if you had a late payment between 7 and 12 months ago, you’re fine.
If you can meet those criteria, you have until Dec. 31, 2015, to apply for a HARP refinance through either your current lender or a new lender.

Should You Apply?

HARP makes sense if you owe more than your house is worth, which is preventing you from refinancing, according to Bob Walters, chief economist at Quicken Loans. You’ll still pay full-market rates for a HARP refinance, not a discounted rate or payment that you might get with a loan modification.

As a rule of thumb, for fixed-rate mortgages, you’ll want your new rate to be at least a half-point better than your old one.

Lowering your interest can pay off immediately. Let’s say you took out a 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage at 6.5% for $176,800 at a monthly payment of $1,117.50 five years ago.

Today, you’d still owe $168,065. If you refinance that balance into a new 30-year loan at 4.5%, your monthly payment would drop to $851.56, saving you about $266 a month. Or, you could refinance into a 15-year fixed-rate loan, pay about $168 a month more, and pay your loan off about 10 years earlier.

HARP might also make sense if you can convert an adjustable-rate mortgage to a fixed-rate mortgage. Even if an ARM’s monthly payment is low now, it’ll go up if rates rise.

When applying for HARP, you need paperwork just like any other mortgage application:

  • Pay stubs
  • Tax returns
  • Mortgage statements
  • Account balances
  • Debt totals (for credit cards, student loans, car loans, and such)
  • Details about any second mortgages or home equity lines of credit

Pay attention to the fees associated with the refinancing, which the lender must disclose up front, and ask if those costs can be rolled into the new loan if you’re strapped for cash.

Tips to Make the Process Go Smoothly

To keep the process moving, ask your lender for a list of the documents it will need. Give yourself two weeks to collect everything.

If possible, submit the entire packet together via certified mail. Sending in documents piecemeal could result in lost paperwork and your loan application falling to the bottom of the pile, says Nicole Hall, editor of LendingTree.com. Keep detailed records of any phone calls you make, and dates you mail or fax correspondences.

There are companies that will offer to take care of the paperwork for a fee, but you don’t need to pay. You can access free help through a housing counselor approved by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. Counselors will help you understand the Making Home Affordable program and aid in gathering the documents needed for your loan servicer.

Don’t qualify for HARP? Then maybe its sister program, HAMP, is for you.

By: Donna Fuscaldo


Need help? Give me, Lucy Garber a call at (310) 293-4866.  I can refer you to some great mortgage brokers I’ve worked with over the years.